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HCV On List of Cancer Causing Agents

February 2, 2005

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This announcement is not news to most Hepatitis C patients. We have been told about the possible long term risks associated with Hepatitis C and liver cancer has always been included among them. However, and this needs to be stated, compared to the number of patients with chronic Hepatitis C, the number of patients who develop Hepatocellular Carcinoma (liver cancer) is very small.

The huge majority of patients are not at risk. But, it doesn’t hurt to behave as if we all are. That is why I always recommend choosing a lifestyle, diet, and nutritional supplementation that will protect and support your liver (along with any therapy you might choose to do—pharmaceutical or otherwise).

New entries on list of cancer-causing agents

Monday, January 31, 2005 Posted: 2:26 PM EST (1926 GMT)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government on Monday added 17 substances to the official list of cancer-causing agents, including the first viruses: hepatitis B and C and some human papillomaviruses that cause common sexually transmitted diseases.

Lead and lead compounds, X-rays, compounds found in grilled meats and various substances used in textile dyes, paints and inks are among the other new listings, the Department of Health and Human Services said in releasing the 11th edition of the federal Report on Carcinogens.

The additions bring to 246 the total number of substances that either are “known to be human carcinogens” or “reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens.” The report now lists 58 “known” — including the viruses — and 188 “reasonably anticipated” substances.

Hepatitis B and C, which cause liver disease, were added because studies in humans show that chronic infections cause liver cancer. Some of the human papilloma viruses, which are sexually transmitted, were included because studies show they cause cervical cancer in women, the department said.

Federal law requires the HHS secretary to publish the report every two years.

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