The latest research & treatment news about Hepatitis C infection, diagnosis, symptoms and treatment.

Menu Search
Previous

Caffeine, HCV and Liver Health

Back to News Homepage
Next

HCV On List of Cancer Causing Agents

HCV Market Analysis Redux

The Editors at Hepatitis Central
January 27, 2005

Print this page

Here is another press release regarding the state of the market for Hepatitis B and C treatment. The press release is about the industry report available from Research and Markets, an industry research organization. It is the same report referenced by DataMonitor in my January 12th update.

Incidentally, the price of this report is $15,200.

Please note, this report states that “the needs of non-responders, genotype 1 and intolerant patients will not be satisfied in the short term.” It also suggests that the pharmaceutical companies look to “tap into a substantial amount of unidentified cases or meet the needs of non-responder or difficult to treat patients.

Hepatitis B and C – Winning Battles But Not The War

Press Release
Source: Research and Markets
Thursday January 27, 8:01 am ET

DUBLIN, Ireland–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jan. 27, 2005–Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c12272) has announced the addition of Stakeholder Insight: Hepatitis B & C – Winning Battles But Not The War to their offering

According to the WHO, 350-400 million are chronically infected with HBV and 170-200 million with HCV. Although HBV vaccination and routine screening of donated blood has decreased incidence, the death toll resulting from chronic disease, cirrhosis and HCC is as high as one million per year (WHO, 2002). For HCV related conditions, this number will increase further over the next 10-20 years.

Despite substantial prevalence for both HBV and HCV, the incidence of new infections within the seven major markets has reduced over the last decade due to HBV vaccination, increased blood and pre-natal screening along with awareness campaigns regarding routes of transmission. Our recent physician survey indicates that while diagnosis rates of HBV have remained flat since 2002, HCV diagnosis rates have increased 2-4 fold, with highest growth in Japan

Increased uptake and aggressive life-cycle management of peginterferons (plus ribavirin) have driven the current standard of care to 73% of first-line choice for HCV. Our physician research (180 respondents) reveals higher use of branded peginterferon plus ribavirin packages, where consistency was cited as key selection criterium. Again, the treated patient pool will be increased by higher diagnosis, redefinition of ‘normal’ ALT and maintenance therapy. However, the needs of non-responders, genotype 1 and intolerant patients will not be satisfied in the short term.

Scope of Report

  • Comprehensive overview of HBV and HCV epidemiology with comment on latest dynamics
  • Analysis of drug treatment choice per line therapy per region for both HBV and HCV
  • Discussion with key opinion leaders with regard to clinical and non-clinical attributes of therapy
  • Future outlook for new HBV and HCV therapies along with unmet needs assessment

Highlights

  • While diagnosis rates of HBV have remained flat since 2002, HCV diagnosis rates have increased 2-4 fold with highest growth in Japan.
  • Based on current estimates of prevalence, diagnosis and treatment current patient pools of between 1.8-2.0 million per disease.
  • To increase the treatment pool, manufacturers of hepatitis treatments can either tap into a substantial amount of unidentified cases or meet the needs of non-responder or difficult to treat patients.
No Comments - be the first!
Share
Share
Previous

Caffeine, HCV and Liver Health

Back to News Homepage
Next

HCV On List of Cancer Causing Agents

Requirements for using and reposting articles

Comments

HepatitisCentral.com provides information regarding hepatitis and liver disease. Comments are available to the community in order to discuss these topics and obtain answers to questions through community members. The Editors at HepatitisCentral.com will not be responding to questions or comments posed in article comments.